What Are The Best Equalizer Settings For Car Audio? A Car EQ Guide

Tuning your car sound system with an equalizer can be a frustrating mess and a waste of time if you’re not sure what to do. To make matters worse, there’s a lack of good information out there. I’d love to help clear things up!

In this article I’ll explain in clear words along with great diagrams and images:

  • What an equalizer is, how they work, and the different kinds
  • Why speakers and car audio systems benefit from using an equalizer
  • Some basic recommended EQ settings for many cases
  • How to set your EQ and tune your system the right way (using affordable tools that work great)
  • What to do if you’re still having sound problems

What are the best equalizer settings? The honest truth

Image of man thinking about car equalizer settings

The honest truth is that there’s not a true “best” equalizer or audio system setting. It depends on your goals, but ultimately, the best settings are those that let you tailor the sound in a way that pleases your ears the most.

However, I do have some general equalizer guidelines that can help you. I’ll make sure to cover those in a separate section below after explaining why an equalizer (EQ) is so helpful and the problems with speaker sound.

Sound systems for cars always have areas that need improvement if you really want to enjoy your music to its full potential. I’ll explain specifically what those are and the EQ settings you’ll need to fix that.

But before we get to that, let’s better understand what equalizers do and how they work.

What is an equalizer? How does an equalizer work?

Car audio equalizer examples

Examples of the most common type of car audio equalizers you’ll find are shown here. It’s possible to find good EQs in some aftermarket head units. However, you can also use an external add-on EQ to get great sound in your ride.

What does an equalizer do? Why are equalizers needed?

Diagram showing example equalizer settings to use

Equalizers allow you to improve the sound of a speaker system by boosting or cutting ranges of sound as needed where they’re lacking or have “peaks” (too much volume). The goal is “smoothing” the sound to remove harshness or a lack of bass, for example. Ultimately though, they’re also a great way to adjust the sound to your liking.

Equalizers allow you to correct problems with a sound system in car audio by boosting (increasing the volume of) or cutting (reducing the volume of) small sections (limited-width segments) of sound in the range of musical sound frequencies. These specifics “sections” are fixed around a central point called the center frequency.

In a perfect world, speakers would produce a perfectly flat sound output with no dips or harshness in the sound you hear. That’s impossible and there are always areas where the sound can use improvements.

The basic bass and treble controls included with many head units can’t correct much, sadly. Fortunately, an equalizer lets us correct many of these problems.

Equalizer bands and boost or cut (attenuation)

Equalizer band comparison diagram

Equalizers split up sound adjustment into small “bands” of sound frequencies centered around a single frequency. The amount of bands (amount of adjustment slots if you will) available determines how much control you have. The more bands, the finer and better the improvements you can make.

The amount of boost or attenuation you can apply is measured in decibels (dB) and usually there’s a maximum range of +/-9dB to +/-18dB. However, it depends on the particular model and design. 9dB and 12dB EQs are very common.

The number of bands an EQ has increases the amount of control you have over the audio sound adjustment range. More bands provide a means for better sound adjustment (you’ll be able to better correct speaker sound problems when tuning).

A 31-band EQ, for example, offers a lot of audio control but take can take a lot of time to tune a system. When choosing a more basic equalizer vs one with more bands, the best choice is the one with more bands

How does an equalizer work?

How does an equalizer work diagram

Equalizers work by dividing up the full range of sound into smaller sections called bands. These are centered around the EQ center frequencies. This section of sound is then increased or decreased as you like to adjust the sound. The bands are then recombined and output as a full range again with the EQ adjustments included.

Equalizers work by taking the full-range sound of each stereo channel (or mono, if it’s a subwoofer crossover, for example) and dividing them into “bands” using filters. Each filter directs the sound frequencies of that band, based around the band frequency, to a circuit that increases or decreases the volume of that range depending on your adjustments.

The sound from each of those circuits is then combined back together and sent out to your amplifier or speaker system. The end result is the same input sound but with EQ adjustments applied to it – not just a simple bass and treble improvement!

Some equalizers use a single set of controls for both of the front and rear speakers (one set of EQ controls for both stereo channels) while others have separate left and right channels for better tuning. Some provide EQ channels for both front and rear speakers.

In some cases, another smaller set of bands for subwoofer bass tuning is provided. This is often the case for digital equalizers like those in touchscreen car stereos.

Analog vs digital equalizers

Analog equalizers use electronic hardware such as op-amps, resistors, or integrated circuits to adjust the sound output as you adjust it. Digital equalizers (in most cases) are different in that they do this in software using mathematical software routines.

While both have their pros and cons, digital equalizers offer more features these days and save money since and space since they don’t need the added hardware to do the work. In many cases they also include adjustable crossovers that make system adjustment even better.

Basic recommended car equalizer settings – setting your EQ by ear

In dash car stereo with equalizer shown

In this section, I’ll share with you some basic steps and EQ settings when doing it by ear. In the section after this I’ll go the best way to do so: by tuning your system using the right tools.

Note that tuning audio in car systems by ear is more for correcting just the most obvious problems you can hear easily. To really know what’s going on with your system, you’ll need the right tools and approach I’ll share in the sound system car tuning guide below.

Getting started with the basics

You’ll want to do a few things before trying to adjust an equalizer because having too many adjustments means they can work against each other, meaning you might not get anywhere!

Image showing bass boost and EQ of car stereo turned off

My advice is to do the following before adjusting an EQ:

  • Disable any special audio modes like bass boost or “musical enhancement.” Turn the bass boost, if present, to “flat” or off.
  • Set the equalizer band adjustments all to flat. That is, to 0dB level, in the middle of the equalizer display (or to 0dB if it uses a number style control).

Diagram showing example equalizer settings to use

For many speaker systems (for example factory speakers with a factory-installed head unit), typically the sound is lacking in 2 or more areas:

  • Not enough bass
  • Too much mid range
  • Not enough treble (high frequency sounds like cymbals and string instruments)
  • Music has poor detail and doesn’t sound like the recording should

In this case, I recommend doing the following, being sure to use small increments of the equalizer and make changes slowly while listening carefully.

  1. Increase the bass a bit in the low-end range. This will be a band with a frequency of 60Hz or close to it – this depends on your particular EQ. You can then increase it a bit in the band above it and hear the results (ex.: 120Hz band, which is still bass but on the lower end of mid range sound & vocals).
  2. Increase the treble 6dB or so around the highest band on the upper end of the EQ, then continue increasing by 3dB if you hear an improvement. Continue until it sounds unpleasant to you, then decrease back until it’s better. This is usually a band with 16KHz or similar (some only go to 12KHz, which isn’t good, sadly). Treble can be a problem because of speaker placement being less than ideal in vehicles along with poor quality factory-installed speakers, too.
  3. If you hear “harshness” and the vocals and instruments in music sound like they’re grating on your nerves, you probably need to decrease mid range sound. Start with a band around 1KHz and decrease by about 3dB and listen for improvement. If there isn’t any, set it back to 0, then move up to 2KHz, 4KHz, and so on as needed.

Diagram showing typical EQ bands for adjustment

Note: I recommend using a music test track to do this. You can buy audio test tracks for download or CDs to buy online. Alternatively, you can use a song you know extremely well that you’ve heard on a high-fidelity system before.

The idea is to know how the music should sound with everything set up properly and judge your EQ settings by ear using test music.

Our ears are most sensitive in the midrange span of sounds so that’s often one of the biggest problem areas of speakers that need attention. Tweeters very often need some increase at the high end, too. It’s a huge problem with factory-installed tweeters that have a poor response (sound output) at the highest end of the sound range.

It’s also a common issue since many car tweeters are mounted in a location where they’re pointing away from you. That’s because tweeters are most effective with a directional installation where they’re facing your ears (called “on-axis”) and not to the side or away from them.

If not, you’ll hear get a fairly high loss in the treble range in music.

How to tune your system for the best EQ settings

Car audio real time analyzer examples

Some examples of your options for measuring and tuning your car audio speaker system. Of the 3, using a laptop and RTA software or smartphone app are the best values for the dollar. Today’s smartphone apps like AudioTool offer many of the same features as much more expensive options.

As I mentioned earlier, without question the best way to tune your system (find the optimal equalizer settings) is to use a measurement tool and find the areas that needed adjusting. To do so, you’ll need a real-time analyzer (RTA) and microphone. There’s simply NO WAY to get the best sound using only some music and adjusting it by ear.

In the past this use to be a serious pain in the neck – if you could even at all find an RTA to use. Until some years ago, real-time analyzers were far too rare and expensive. A dedicated portable unit like the AudioControl SA-3050, for example, often sold for $1,500. They were heavy, limited in functions, and battery power wasn’t even standard!

Thankfully, these days you can find get professional results using your laptop and RTA software (such as TrueRTA, for example) or use an RTA app with your Apple or Android phone.

Of the two, the most affordable and convenient option is to use your smartphone. For the sake of keeping things simple, I’ll cover using a smartphone and an RTA app. I recommend AudioTool for Android as it’s very good and while it’s not free, it’s cheap! ($7.99 at this time).

Using a smartphone app for tuning isn’t as accurate as say a much more advanced (and costly) real-time analyzer tool setup. However, you’ll still get pretty good measurements and results you’ll enjoy if you use it properly.

Using an RTA app for tuning (and why you need a good microphone)

Smartphone vs calibrated test microphone comparison diagram

Although you can use your smartphone’s built-in microphone to get you by, I don’t recommend it for tuning your equalizer/sound system. Built-in mics have poor frequency measurement performance compared to a real test microphone. Calibrated microphones also include a file to allow them to give a near-perfect measurement if your RTA supports it.

While you can use your smartphone’s built-in microphone with an RTA app to tune your system and set your EQ, I don’t recommend it. They’re poor for measuring sound and your readings will be off – way off in some cases!

Dayton Audio iMM-6 calibrated smartphone mic

You’re much better off buying an affordable calibrated microphone like the Dayton Audio iMM-6 at about $17. Each one includes a unique calibration file to help you get more accurate readings. You don’t have to use calibration (the mic is already pretty good) but it’s free, so why not get the most out of it?

How to tune a car equalizer

Using RTA for car audio tuning in car placement diagram

Your goal should be not to get perfect sound but to correct the areas where the speakers have bad peaks or valleys in the sound output.  For that, you’ll want more expensive tools and a lot more effort and time.

The most important thing is to have a pretty good idea of what’s going on with the sound output and correct the most troublesome sound points.

how to tune a car audio system using a real time analyzer diagram

To tune your system and measure where you need to make improvements using your EQ, you’ll want to do the following:

    1. Park your vehicle in a quiet area without outside noise that can interfere with your measurements. Leave the vehicle engine off.
    2. Set up your RTA to an “octave” mode similar to the number of bands on your EQ. Set the measuring speed to medium or slow. I personally prefer 1/3 octave (31 bands) mode but for those of you with fewer EQ bands, setting it to a smaller number of bands for the RTA display should help.
    3. Set your equalizer to all-flat (all settings at zero), bass boost OFF, and any other sound enhancement disabled.
    4. For systems using amplifiers, be sure you’re not using a bass boost for the subwoofers.
    5. With the RTA running and your microphone connected (set up the RTA’s mic option if needed), play a pink noise test track for measuring the system’s sound output with the RTA. (You can use an audio file or CD, but it needs to be high-quality and not compressed audio to make sure you’re generating real pink noise that’s not altered and that could result in bad measurements.) Note that some RTA apps can generate noise so you can connect the output to the AUX input of some head units.
    6. With the RTA running and held in a middle place between the seats near ear level, note areas where there are dips and peaks in your system’s response. 
    7. Begin adjusting the EQ a small amount for the bands in those spots and carefully watch the changes. Turning the EQ up or down too much for each frequency can cause you to have to constantly compensate by changing other bands as they interact. Do it a little at a time.
    8. A near-perfectly tuned system would appear as a nearly flat RTA line across the entire audio range. However, that’s not realistic. We’re aiming to get as close as we can to that then make custom adjustments later.
    9. Once you’re satisfied you’ve got it corrected (it takes a bit of time and patience!), save your EQ settings as a preset if it’s a digital equalizer. For analog (dial or slider type EQs) units, take notes for future reference.
    10. Final touches: play a music track (with good bass) that you’re VERY familiar with and know the sound on a proper system. Carefully make changes as you need to for what sounds best to you. In my experience, this is increasing the low-end bass (around 60Hz), lower midrange (around 120Hz), and higher frequencies (16 to 20KHz) depending on your hearing and taste.

The best goal isn’t to get perfect sound but instead (1) correct the worst problems in your sound system and (2) adjust the results to get the sound that YOU really enjoy with your music.

After tuning the system, feel free to use bass boost or other features if you think you like how they sound. However, be aware that a properly tuned system with good speaker performance normally doesn’t need a bass boost or gimmicks to make it sound right.

You should be able to hear sufficient bass when it’s adjusted optimally.

Those are instead for:

  • Making up for what your system is lacking (for example, poor subwoofer output
  • Occasionally adding that extra slam to your favorite music when you’re in the mood – just not every day
Important: Sometimes there’s only so much you can do. If you’re not able to tune your system enough and there are still terrible “dips” in the sound, it’s because of the speakers.

In that case, no amount of tuning can help. You’ll need to work on improving either the installation, the speakers, or both.

Upgrades that make a huge difference when your EQ can’t

Examples of recommended car audio upgrades for better sound

Equalizers are great but they can only do so much. Since they’re limited to a range of +/-12dB to +/-9db of sound adjustment typically, that means for problems exceeding that, you won’t be able to correct it enough.

Some of the biggest problems with car audio systems are very common based on what I’ve seen over the years. It depends a LOT on the particular vehicle, the speakers used, and much more.

In most case it’s due to one or more of the following problems:

  • Poor or no low-end bass: needs a subwoofer to be added or better subwoofer to replace the current one
  • Poor/very weak treble: Needs tweeters to be replaced and/or added. Also, consider moving tweeters to a better location facing the driver & passenger seats.
  • Music sounds “thin” and unnatural (poor midrange): Requires a speaker upgrade as this is a sign of poor speaker performance.
  • Distortion during playback especially at high volume: Insufficient power to drive the speakers. Consider driving them with an amplifier or replace a factory amplifier (if equipped) or a higher power aftermarket model.

The good news is that these days you don’t need to spend a ton of money on any of these. Each one can be found (with pretty good quality and sound, I might add!) for around $100 or less. In fact, by replacing all of the main components (a better sounding head unit, front and rear speakers, add a subwoofer for bass, driving speakers with an amp, and so forth) you’ll get great sound that no factory system can match.

More related articles you’ll enjoy

I’ve got some other great info to help you learn more:

Questions, comments, or etc?

If you’ve got questions or a comment feel free to post them below! Feel free to contact me here on my Contact page.

Your comments are welcome!

  1. hi! just had a look in you post but to be honest I’m completely lost
    i would like if possible to give me some help to do the eq settings in this amplifier match up7bmw installed by myself.. of course i will pay for your service if possible
    thank you

    Reply
    • Hello there. You can get the general idea of how to adjust your system yourself in my article. It shows what you can use to tune your equalizer depending on what type you have. If you need hands-on help, it may be better to visit a good car stereo shop and ask. Experienced people will be able to explain things to you clearly and help you.

      Unfortunately, your comment was very vague so I’m not able to help without better information as I have no idea exactly what you need help with. If you have some specific questions I’ll try to help. Have a good weekend. :)

      Reply

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